Milota Havránková.

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Milota Havránková.

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intro

milota is considered to be an exceptional phenomenon in Slovak and Czech photography. She experiments, breaks traditions, transforms and modernises her personal style. She exploits new technologies and possibilities, transcending photography into architecture, painting and fashion design. She has taught young people for over thirty years, and shaped the “Slovak new wave”, the generation of successful photographers who fundamentally influence the Czech photographic scene. Her creative approach significantly influenced the Slovak art scene, the younger generation in particular.

contact: info@milotahavrankova.com

1945
Born 7 August 1945 Košice, Slovakia
1960–64
School of Applied Arts, Bratislava
1966–71
Academy of Performing Arts, Prague (Prof. Ján Šmok)
1963–65
Photojournalist – Film Studios Koliba, Bratislava
1971
Freelance artist
1972–77
School of Applied Arts, Bratislava, teacher of art photography
1977–91
Freelance artist
1990
Co-founder of GALÉRIA X, Bratislava
1991
Academy of Fine Arts, Bratislava, co-founder of the Department of Art Photography, Head of the Studio of Art Photography, member of the Academic Senate
1994
Film School of the Academy of Performing Arts, Prague, teacher at the Department of Photography
1995
Named the Associate Professor of Photography, Academy of Performing Arts, Prague
2002
Head of the Department of Photography and New Media, Academy of Fine Arts, Bratislava, member of the Academic Senate of the Academy of Fine Arts
2006
Named the Professor of Creative Art by the President of Slovakia, Bratislava
2007–2011
Director and curator of PF 01 Gallery of the Student Loan Fund, Bratislava
2012 - 2013
Professor at the Department of Photography, Film Academy of Perfoming Arts in Prague, Czech Republic
2013
Head of Studio 'Medium of Photography', Academy of Arts, Banska Bystrica, Slovakia

Nature by itself offers kitschy beauty – do we have to question the forget-me-not in grass covered with dew? Does it have to be made more complex?
I accept it and therefore I do not take such photographs. Why? When I go to the seaside, I can find beautiful postcards of what I can see with the naked eye in every stand. If I want to, I can buy them immediately because they are better than the photographs I would take. My ambition is to photograph feelings. Something that they evoke in me, in what way they inspire me, what moves me forward. And it is difficult.
Can this ambition be achieved by staged photography?
I have never been a photojournalist, though my children maintain that their children’s photographs can be easily exhibited. I am a synthetic artist who has to experience something and then tell about it. Staging is dominant for me. I change styles and methods according to my needs because the medium has so many unexploited means of expression that I am tempted to try everything. I do not want to set the world on fire. I simply take photographs in order to develop internally, not to stage other exhibitions. If I only had three or four good exhibitions in my lifetime, it would be a great success. When I finish something, somehow, it does not interest me any more. I am always driven further.
You have experimented from the very beginning. Have people understood your second language – photography?
I photographed for Echo (a magazine for university students in the 1960s) when I was still a student; I was supposed to document something. However, I did not document anything, but I did it in my own way. In spite of this, the magazine was full of my photographs and they apparently communicated something. Perhaps I hit the chord of the generation, the moments we experienced together in those times. Yet I have never reflected on it.
Can your students be compared with the generation of the 1960s?
We were different in that we greatly respected models and authorities. We did not have so many opportunities for communicating and obtaining information, everything was shrouded in secrecy. We experienced euphoria; everything unavailable seemed like a miracle. We almost did not need any teachers: we were able to support each other, and lived up to our ideals. The contemporary generation is overloaded with superfluous information thus the young people want to test and “finger” everything, including the artworks by leading artists.

1995
Lublin (Poland), GALERIA TEATRU NN, Milota Havránková – Photography – video projection
Bratislava (Slovakia), HOTEL DANUBE, Light and photographic design – video projection - fashion show and exhibition of photographs
1996
Prague (Czech Republic), GALERIE ŘÁSNOVKA, Milota and Her Guests – photographs and fashion show
1997
Prague (Czech Republic), VELTRŽNÍ PALÁC, digital photography – photographic design and fashion show
Bratislava (SR), MONTH OF PHOTOGRAPHY, graphics – silkscreen printing in textiles – photographs
2000
Cheb (Czech Republic), GALERIE G4, Milota Havránková – Photography
Prague (Czech Republic), KOMORNÍ GALERIE DOMU FOTOGRAFIE Jozefa Sudka, Essential Game
Košice (Slovakia), GALÉRIA NOVA, Milota
2004
Washington DC (USA), GALLERY OF KOLOMAN SOKOL, Milota
2005
Washington DC (USA), GALLERY 10, Milota Havránková
Bratislava (Slovakia), GALÉRIA MESTA BRATISLAVY, Green House
Prague (Czech Republic), GALLERY ART FACTORY, Green House 2
Bratislava (Slovakia), GALÉRIA NOVA, Dialogue
2007
Nitra (Slovakia), NITRIANSKA GALÉRIA, In the Circle M.H.
Martin (Slovakia), TURČIANSKÁ GALÉRIA, Message M.H.
2008
Vienna (Austria), SLOVENSKÝ INŠTITÚT, Being
2009
Bratislava (Slovakia), GALÉRIA FORZET, 07-00
2009
London (UK), EMBASSY OF THE SLOVAK REPUBLIC, Blue Roof